Wednesday, November 14, 2018

BULLETIN: Elizabeth gives birth to a son, crowd goes wild

Page 1 of the New York Times  November 15, 1948


November 14, 1948


Princess Elizabeth, the heiress presumptive to the British throne, gave  birth to a son.  The news was released in an official announcement from Buckingham Palace.

"Her Royal Highness the Princess Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh was safely delivered of a Prince at 9:14 P.M. today.  Her Royal Highness and her son are both doing well."

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth were in the palace for the birth of their first grandchild.  Their younger daughter, Princess Margaret, who moves down to third in the line of succession,  was out of the palace for evening. 

Queen Mary, who lives at Marlborough House, "hastened over and received her full share of cheers."  When she returned to her home at midnight, her "car was surrounded by a frenzied crowd," reported the New York Times.

The Home Secretary, James Chuter Ede, was the first person to "be officially notified.  [ The newspapers reported that this was the "first time in centuries that a  Home Secretary was not in official attendance at a royal birth," as King George VI had "abolished the ancient custom."  Yes, it is true, that the King ended the custom before Elizabeth gave birth, but the final royal birth for the Home Secretary was on December 25, 1936, when the Duchess of Kent gave birth to Princess Alexandra.  The formality was dispensed during the second world war for the births of Prince William of Gloucester (1941), Prince Michael of Kent (1942) and the Duke of Gloucester (1944).]

Mr. Chuder Ede immediately informed the Lord Mayor of the news of birth.  "Telegrams and messages" were sent to the rest of the United Kingdom and to all the Governors of the Dominions.

The New York Times described the birth as the "biggest news in the world to millions of persons."  As "affair of state," the birth of a prince is considered a :"great national and imperial event." 

What "counts most of all" is that the infant prince will succeed his mother on the throne.  This birth is seen as a "long historic tradition and a great wave of simple human joy."

The Princess' gynecologist, Sir William Gilliat, arrived at the palace last night at about 10:00 p.m.  Earlier this evening Sir William summoned his assistant, John H. Peel and the the royal family's physician, Sir John Weir.  An anesthetist V.F. Hall was also called.   The doctors arrived shortly after 7:30 p.m.   The baby was born less than two hours later, thus assuming that the princess "had a relatively easy time of it."

The news of the birth was made public at 10:10 p.m.

The Press Association's Court Correspondent reported:  "The new royal baby was described to me by one who has just seen him as a 'lovely boy, a really splendid baby.'" 

A large crowd waited outside Buckingham Palace.  A royal page slipped out the palace and whispered the news to a police constable, who made the announcement to the crowd: "It's a boy!" 

The crowd broke into "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow."  There were also cheers "We Want Philip, We want Philip, we want Philip," which continued for about five minutes. 

No members of the Royal Family appeared on the palace's balcony, as it was "not considered for Philip to make a public appearance despite the urging of the crowd."

The huge crowd went wild," reported the Washington Post, after hearing the news.  The baby's father, the Duke of Edinburgh, was playing squash when he was told by the doctor that he was a father. He immediately rushed to his wife, who was still under an anesthetic.  He was then taken to see his newborn son, who had been taken to the palace nursery.

The Duke of Edinburgh then brought the King and Queen to see their first grandchild.  Queen Elizabeth "embraced her son-in-law and the King shook his hand warmly."

A bottle of champagne was opened after 81-year-old Queen Mary arrived.  The "first health" to the infant prince was drunk by the Duke and his staff.

The Washington Post's reporter commented that "many years may pass" before the new prince "ever touches a scepter.  King George is only 53 and in excellent health.  Princess Elizabeth at 22 is apparently assured of a long life, too."









Tuesday, November 13, 2018

The Prince of Wales with his family

Two photos were released today to commemorate the Prince of Wales' 70th birthday


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allowed for embedding although embedding code is missing

Happy 75th birthday to Crown Princess Katherine

Crown Princess Katherine, the consort of Crown Prince Alexander of Serbia, celebrates her 75th birthday.  May I offer my congratulations to a very sweet, hardworking lady, who is called the "Jewel of Serbia."

I have had the honor and great pleasure to visit Serbia on three occasions: Crown Prince Alexander's 60th birthday celebrations in 2004,  the couple's 25th wedding anniversary in 2010 and the State Funerals for King Peter II, Queen Alexandra, Queen Marie and Prince Andrej, in 2013.  I also had the honor of being invited to Prince Philip's wedding in October 2017, but, sadly, had to decline.   (I also can say that in 2004, I joined the Crown Princess for a shopping trip to Tysons shopping center in Fairfax County,  Virginia, as she and several friends, were on a mission to find a gown for the birthday celebration.)

Crown Princess Katherine does so much good for Serbia, especially for culture, women, children and medical needs.

She is the Founder and Patron of Lifeline.

Happy, Happy Birthday!!!

An interview from 2010

 https://royalmusingsblogspotcom.blogspot.com/2010/09/exclusive-interview-with-crown-prince.html

https://www.lifelinechicago.org/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQBnYjrpanA&feature=youtu.be

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Friday, November 9, 2018

An abdication for Wilhelm

all images: Marlene A. Eilers Koenig Collection



It was on October 4, 1918, that the German Chancellor,  Prince Max of Baden succumbed to the pressure from the Supreme Army Command and asked American President Woodrow Wilson to "arrange an armistice."  Prince Max also accepted Wilson's "Fourteen Points" plan as the "basis for the forthcoming negotiations.   Kaiser Wilhelm II's biographer John Röhl described Max, in his first act as chancellor, as "hapless."





Max was ordered to capitulate and was told by Wilhelm II: "The Supreme Command consider an armistice necessary and you have not been brought here to make things difficult for the Supreme Command."



But Americans were not planning to negotiate with Wilhelm II.  By  October 23, it became clear that Wilhelm's abdication "rose to the very forefront of the domestic agenda."


Revolution was fomenting throughout Germany.  Wilhelm II was furious with President Wilson.  "That brute is demanding my removal and that of all the other monarchs in Germany. He has now thrown aside the mask and will get what is coming to him."


Wilhelm was deluded into thinking that the German people "were staunchly monarchist."

It was on October 29 that the Emperor, who had been in Berlin since the beginning of the month,  left the capital to return to Spa, Belgium, where the Supreme Headquarters was located.  Prince Max told Wilhelm that leaving for Spa would not be in his best interests or in Germany's.


Wilhelm II would never return to Germany.   His decision to leave Berlin proved to be a disastrous decision, putting him further out of touch "with the rapidly changing developments in the capital."


Max was now placed in a difficult position, knowing that Wilhelm's abdication could no longer be avoided.   The Prussian Minister of the Interior was sent to Spa to urge Wilhelm to abdicate.

The Emperor refused.  "I wouldn't dream of abdicating.  The King of Prussia must not leave Germany in the lurch, least of all at a time like this; I too have sworn my oath and will keep it.  I wouldn't dream of quitting my throne on account of a few hundred Jews or 1,000 workers -- you go and tell that to your masters in Berlin."







Wilhelm remained convinced that he had the solid support of the German army.  "My duty as Supreme Lord forbids me to abandon the army."


The revolution spread like wildfire throughout Germany, leading to the end of the German monarchies.  The King of Bavaria's throne collapsed on the night of November 7-8, followed the next day by most of the other monarchs.


This was followed by demonstrations and a general strike.  The Social Democrats, the majority party in the government, threatened to pull out if Wilhelm II did not abdicate.   Two of his aides come up with idea that he could abdicate as Emperor but remain as King of Prussia.

Wilhelm II "clutched at this straw," wanting to hold onto his Prussian throne, although others knew that could not happen.  It was not what Prince Max wanted to hear as he was making plans to announce the abdication in Berlin.




Wilhelm remained convinced that he had the solid support of the German army.  "My duty as Supreme Lord forbids me to abandon the army."

The revolution spread like wildfire throughout Germany, leading to the end of the German monarchies.  The King of Bavaria's throne collapsed on the night of November 7-8, followed the next day by most of the other monarchs.

This was followed by demonstrations and a general strike.  The Social Democrats, the majority party in the government, threatened to pull out if Wilhelm II did not abdicate.   Two of his aides come up with idea that he could abdicate as Emperor but remain as King of Prussia.

Wilhelm II "clutched at this straw," wanting to hold onto his Prussian throne, although others knew that could not happen.  It was not what Prince Max wanted to hear as he was making plans to announce the abdication in Berlin.

Röhl stated that Prince Max "graphically described" the events in his memoir. "The half hour went by without any sign of the promised wording from Spa, At any moment the Kaiser's dethronement could be proclaimed on the street.  We had no way of stopping that from happening. The dethronement could only be pre-empted by declaring the abdication. If we were to achieve even the slightest advantage for the Kaiser and his House, the abdication had to be made public immediately and could not be announced as an appendage to the dethronement. We tried over and over again to reach the Kaiser. One telephone ... was off the hook, the other one engaged.  I was faced with the dilemma of either waiting or doing nothing, or of acting on my own initiative.  I knew that I was not formally entitled to publish [the abdication] without the Kaiser's express consent. But I held it to my duty to proclaim the Kaiser's decision, which had been reported to me as firm, while there was still some point in doing so."

Thus, Prince Max of Baden, the last the Imperial Chancellor, authorized the Government's news agency to release a statement: "The Kaiser and the King has decided to give up the throne."

Wilhelm was still "dithering" in Spa when the announcement was made.  A few hours later, the German Republic was proclaimed.

Now came the decision on how to protect the former monarch, as "revolutionary troops" marched toward Spa.  His generals waited until the last minute to "inform the Supreme War Lord " that he no longer had the support of the army.

It was over.  The only action now available was to get Wilhelm "secretly across the border in the Netherlands."

One General said of Wilhelm II after he realized that the gig was up, "He said nothing, just looked --looked from one to the other, with an expression first of amazement, then piteous appeal, and then -- just a curious wandering vagueness. He said nothing, and we took him -- just like he were a little child -- and sent him to Holland."































Mail call

Prince Louis' baptism card arrived today.  Still hoping for the Sussex wedding card.








BULLETIN -- FROM BERLIN KAISER ABDICATES


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arrest ordered for Emperor's brother & other news


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November 9, 1918.

News about the ruling families in Germany and Austria is coming fast and furious as re reports about an Armistice.

Here are the latest dispatches.

The Washington Post is reporting that an order for the arrest of Archduke Max, brother of Emperor Karl, has been issued, according to Viennese newspapers.   Archduke Max reportedly left the Hofburg with "heavily laden trunks."

The Washington Post is also reporting that Kaiser Wilhelm II has stated in a cable dispatch that he is extremely reluctant "to abandon my sorely tried people" and has "graciously proclaimed his readiness to become hereditary president of a Prussian or all German republic" if he is unable to retain his imperial crown.

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 A Central News dispatch from Amsterdam states that the King  Wilhelm II of Württemberg has abdicated.

A telegram received in Copenhagen from Brunswick asserts that the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and his successor have abdicated.  The Duke of Brunswick was born Prince Ernst August of Hanover, son of the Duke and Duchess of Cumberland.   The Duchess of Cumberland is Princess Thyra of Denmark, youngest sister of Dowager Queen Alexandra and the Dowager Empress of Russia. 

The Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg married Princess Viktoria Luise of Prussia, only daughter of Kaiser Wilhelm II, in May 1913.  They have two sons, Ernst August, and Georg Wilhelm and a daughter, Friederike Luise.    Young Prince Ernst August, the heir, is four years old.

The German Emperor and the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg are first cousins of King George V.




Consent given to the Duke of the Abruzzi's marriage



November 9, 1908


The marriage between the Duke of the Abruzzi and Miss Katherine Elkins will take place in Rome or Turin in 1909, according to the Daily Express.

The London-based newspaper "claims to have authority to state that the king and members of the royal family wish for the marriage to be solemnized in Italy with State ceremonies so that the nation may participate.

King Vittorio Emanuele's consent has been obtained and Miss Elkins will be recognized "as a royal princess."  Queen Elena has been a "strong supporter" of the young American woman throughout.

It is understood that the newlyweds will live in Turin in a new wing now being built to the palace.

However, according to the Washington Post,  Miss Elkins' family states that there has  been "no change in the status" of the couple's relationship and "no definite announcement of any sort" is expected in the near future.

A formal announcement will come from Italy and not from Miss Elkins' family.  There are too many "unauthorized and speculative stories regarding the affair," which have annoyed Senator Elkins and his family.

The stories about a special dowry are "erroneous," as well as "unjust to the young couple."


Thursday, November 8, 2018

A thank you from Eugenie and Jack




Arrived in yesterday's mail a thank you from HRH Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank.

Celebrating Queen Sofia of Spain

Queen Sofia of Spain, born Princess Sophie of Greece and Denmark, consort of King Juan Carlos I and mother of King Felipe VI, celebrated her 80th birthday on November 2.

I looked through my photo collection and selected a number of photos to share here on the blog.





































@Marlene A Eilers Koenig



From Bucharest 2011, for King Michael's 90th birthday all photos by Marlene A. Eilers Koenig